Episode 62: Etymological Ghosts

Episode 60: What We Did on Our Summer Vacation

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Episode 55: Our Pet Topic (part two, with cats)

In part two of our miniseries on pets, we cover cats, monkeys, birds, and more. Find out the surprising origins of the word for parrot, what medieval people named their cats, and what bird was symbolic of the Virgin Mary. 

Show Notes

@AllEndlessKnot on Twitter

Medieval Pets by Kathleen Walker-Meikle

"Greek and Roman Household Pets", Francis D. Lazenby

Animals for Show and Pleasure in Ancient Rome, George Dennison

Companion Animals and Us: Exploring the Relationships Between People and Pets Anthony L. Podberscek, Elizabeth S. Paul, James A. Serpell, eds.

Our episode on farm animals

Episode 54: Our Pet Topic (part one)

The Lady and the Unicorn, Desire (Musée de Cluny

Federico II Gonzaga by Titian

Episode 52: Race & Racism in Ancient & Medieval Studies, Part Two: Responses

In part two of our discussion about racism, we talk about ways to respond to the problems in the field, in teaching, scholarship, and more. Thank you to Katherine Blouin, Damian Fleming, Usama Ali Gad, Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Asa Mittman, Dimitri Nakassis, Helen Young, and Donna Zuckerberg for their generous contributions of time and thoughtful discussion of these difficult subjects. Please join in the conversation with your thoughts and ideas about how to move the fields forward.

Show Notes

Transcript

@AllEndlessKnot on Twitter

The Optimist Cocktail

Episode 44: "Us" & "Them" in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds

Episode 51: Race & Racism in Ancient & Medieval Studies, Part One: The Problem

Dr. Katherine Blouin
Everyday Orientalism blog
@isisnaucratis

Dr. Damian Fleming
@FW_Medieval

Dr. Usama Ali Gad
Classics in Arabic blog
@Usamaligad78

Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Classics at the Intersections blog
Sourcebook on Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World
@kataplexis

Dr. Asa Mittman
 Inconceivable Beasts: The Wonders of the East in the Beowulf Manuscript

Dr. Dimitri Nakassis
Aegean Prehistory blog
@DimitriNakassis

Dr. Helen Young
Race & Popular Fantasy: Habits of Whiteness
@heyouonline

Dr. Donna Zuckerberg
Eidolon
@donnazuck

The Public Medievalist's series on Race, Racism, & the Middle Ages

In the Middle blog (frequently has useful posts on these subjects)

Hold My Mead: A Bibliography For Historians Hitting Back At White Supremacy by Sarah Bond

Medieval People of Color Tumblr

Pharos -- documenting misuse of the Classics

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Episode 51: Race & Racism in Ancient & Medieval Studies, Part One: the Problem

What are the problems surrounding race and racism in the fields of Classics and Medieval Studies today? Where did these fields come from, and how does that affect the way we think about the past, and how we construct the present? For this episode (and the next) we interviewed eight scholars and put it together into an exploration of these unfortunately timely topics. Thank you to Katherine Blouin, Damian Fleming, Usama Ali Gad, Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Asa Mittman, Dimitri Nakassis, Helen Young, and Donna Zuckerberg for their generous contributions of time and thoughtful discussion of these difficult subjects. In our next episode, we will hear about possible responses to these problems -- in teaching, scholarship, and more.

Show Notes

Transcript

Conversation Starter cocktail

Episode 44: "Us" & "Them" in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds

Part Two: Responses

Dr. Katherine Blouin
Everyday Orientalism blog
@isisnaucratis

Dr. Damian Fleming
@FW_Medieval

Dr. Usama Ali Gad
Classics in Arabic blog
@Usamaligad78

Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Classics at the Intersections blog
Sourcebook on Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World
@kataplexis

Dr. Asa Mittman
 Inconceivable Beasts: The Wonders of the East in the Beowulf Manuscript

Dr. Dimitri Nakassis
Aegean Prehistory blog
@DimitriNakassis

Dr. Helen Young
Race & Popular Fantasy: Habits of Whiteness
@heyouonline

Dr. Donna Zuckerberg
Eidolon
@donnazuck

The Public Medievalist's series on Race, Racism, & the Middle Ages

In the Middle blog (frequently has useful posts on these subjects)

Hold My Mead: A Bibliography For Historians Hitting Back At White Supremacy by Sarah Bond

Medieval People of Color Tumblr

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Episode 36: Looking for the Legend in Guy Ritchie's King Arthur

We discuss how the recent Guy Ritchie movie King Arthur: Legend of the Sword fits into the history of adaptations of the Arthur legend. What kind of Arthur does it present, how does it interact with the Arthurian tradition, and what themes does it explore? And who has the biggest...er...elephants?

Show Notes

Anglo-Saxon Invasion video

"What is the Earliest English Word?" video

King Arthur Cocktail

King Arthur 2017

Excalibur

King Arthur 2004

History of English podcast episode on the English King Arthur

More reading:

"Color in Ritchie's Legend of the Sword"

"Will the Real King Arthur Please Rise"

"Lock, Stock, & Two Smoking Broadswords"

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Episode 33: Purple, Pink, & Brown

Show Notes

We finish up our colour series (for now!) with a discussion of Purple, Pink, & Brown. From Phoenician shellfish, Virgil's Aeneas,& Propertius's Cynthia, to flowers, beavers, & bears, this episode covers a lot of ground. Let us know what fun colour facts we've missed, and what colourful topics you might like us to cover in the future!

Note: one area of discussion we rather left out is the place of purple in Byzantium/the Eastern Empire... maybe we’ll pick that up in the next episode briefly!

Talk the Talk Podcast

Let’s Talk Talk Podcast

Article on mealtime terms

Aviation

Pink flowers

"Costume" video

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Episode 30: Baba Brinkman & Peer-Reviewed Rap

We have the immense pleasure of interviewing Baba Brinkman, a Canadian rap artist & award-winning playwright best known for his “Rap Guide” series of plays and albums, with which he has toured the world; these cover topics like evolution, religion, medicine, and most recently climate change. He’s also pioneered the genre of ‘lit-hop’ with his adaptations of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Gilgamesh, Beowulf & more. Our conversation ranges through tree-planting; the connections between Homer, Chaucer, & rap; Horace, Lucretius, & Erasmus Darwin as science communicators; the comedy of neuroscience; Trump; language & dictionaries; and more.

At the end of the interview we play a couple of tracks by Baba: his newest single "Erosion", and the first two tracks from his Rap Canterbury Tales album, "General Prologue" & "The Knight's Tale (scene 1)".

Show Notes

Baba Brinkman's website

A brief history of rhyme | Baba Brinkman | TEDxNavesink

Professor Elemental

Baba Brinkman & Professor Elemental - What's Your English?

 

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Episode 28: Coach, or The History (& Future?) of Education

We trace the history of 'coach' back to its Hungarian roots, and explore its connections to the development of higher education in Europe. Then we run through a capsule history of the goals (stated and unstated!) of education from classical Athens to today, and discuss how the new world of online learning, including YouTube and podcasts, fits into the ideals and best practices of the future of education. Please let us know about all the things we over-simplified, left out, or got wrong in the process of covering almost 3000 years of western European schooling, and weigh in on where you see things heading now!

Show Notes

"Coach" video

CGP Grey's video  “Digital Aristotle”

Veritasium's video “This Will Revolutionize Education”

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Episode 19: Beef

We chat about the Norman French influence on Anglo-Saxon words for animals and meat, the powerful emotional and political aspects of the words we use for food, and then delve into Latin technical terms for farmyard animals, ending off with Virgil's pastoral poems, the Eclogues.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

Our Patreon page -- and thank you to all our Patreon supporters!

Show Notes

Classy Little Podcast

Roman Colour Thesaurus – Caroline Lawrence (Roman Mysteries)

Merchandise

Beefeater cocktails

Episode 18: Beer

All about beer! From experiments in baking bread with the leftovers from brewing beer to the etymology of beery words, and the complicated question of how fizzy beer has been through the ages.  We follow up on questions raised in our Loaf podcast, and get some tips from other foodie podcasters.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

Our Patreon page -- and thank you to all our Patreon supporters!

Show Notes

Recreating Egyptian Bread by @miguelesquirol

The Feast Podcast Episode 3: The Medieval Michelin Guide: Finding Food on the Camino de Santiago, 1490

Recipe for medieval trencher bread and recipe for spent grain tea biscuits, via @Feast_Podcast

Our experiment making bread from leftover beer sludge

Gastropod: Everything Old is Brew Again

Posts on traditional Peruvian beer and traditional South African beer via @beervana

Sources for history of barrels: here & here.

Artificial carbonation of beer & cask and bottle conditioning via @Gastropodcast

Episode 17: Loaf

We talk about words for bread and the close connection between "loaf" and lords, ladies, and dairy-maids, then turn to the history of baking bread and our adventures with sourdough, baking Pompeian bread, and brewing beer.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

Our Patreon page -- and thank you to all our Patreon supporters!

Show Notes

Turkish language website
Stack Brewing
"Loaf" video
Re-creating the Pompeii loaf video
 

Our picture of bread from the ROM Pompeii exhibit.

Our picture of bread from the ROM Pompeii exhibit.

A loaf of Pompeian bread from the British Museum

A loaf of Pompeian bread from the British Museum

Our attempt to recreate Pompeian bread:

Episode 11: Cuckold

We discuss the origin of the word ‘Cuckold’, its connection to Valentine’s Day, its modern meaning, and the development of the modern idea of romantic love. Sexual fetishes, horned animals, Chaucer, Jane Austen, and Ovid all make it into the conversation--while we sip some Valentine's Day themed cocktails.

Show Notes

Our Patreon page

Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Valerie Polichar, Lukas Hägele, Evermore Anon, and Ian & Susan McMaster

The Smitten Shine

Love Cocktail

Our Cafepress store

The Horny Cock Valentine's Day Card

The "Cuckold" video

The "Sublime" video

"My Cuckoo Valentine" blog post

Claire McEachern, “Why Do Cuckolds Have Horns?” Huntington Library Quarterly 71. 4 (2008): 607-631.

The article about the capons with spurs grafted to their head is by A.W. Kozelka in the Journal of Heredity, 1929. UPDATE: The article has now been scanned in, here's the picture: 

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Episode 2: A Detective Story

We discuss and play "A Detective Story" (6'40'' - 20'40''), touching on Sir Gawain, Sherlock Holmes, memory palaces, and other ways to remember things.