Episode 70: Carly Silver

We spoke to Carly Silver, an editor and a writer on ancient history and horse racing, about how she connects the past to contemporary issues, the intriguing stories in curse tablets in Roman Britain, murder mysteries set in the ancient world, romance novels, breeding programs for American Thoroughbreds, and more!

Carly’s website

Carly’s article about Hadrian’s Wall

Carly’s article about the sexual assault charges against a workman in ancient Egypt

Carly’s writing about horse racing

Ancient murder mysteries mentioned in the podcast:

Gary Corby, Athenian Mysteries

Lindsey Davis

David Wishart

John Maddox Roberts, SPQR series

Rosemary Rowe

Big Finish Cicero series

Robert Harris

Paul Doherty

Agatha Christie “Death Comes as the End”

Elizabeth Peters

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

The Endless Knot RSS


Episode 62: Etymological Ghosts

Episode 59: From the Sublime to the Romantic

The etymology of 'sublime' takes us through a discussion of the Gothic, Neo-Classical, and Romantic periods, the origins of the Romance languages, the roots of romantic love, and more.

The Sublime Moment Cocktail

Mats Malm “On the Technique of the Sublime”, Comparative Literature, Vol. 52, No. 1 (Winter, 2000), pp. 1-10.

Sarah Bond on Polychromy in Ancient Statues

Alex Potts, Flesh and the Ideal: Winckelmann and the Origins of Art History

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

The Endless Knot RSS

Episode 58: Symposium!

Columella's Mead

Columella's Mead

Paul

Paul

Matt, Vicky, Conor, & Kevin

Matt, Vicky, Conor, & Kevin

Alison, Melanie, & Melissa

Alison, Melanie, & Melissa

Mary, Peter, & Amber

Mary, Peter, & Amber

Rachel Mazzara, Chiara Graf, Drew Davis, Matthew Watton, & Jesse Hill

Rachel Mazzara, Chiara Graf, Drew Davis, Matthew Watton, & Jesse Hill

Episode 55: Our Pet Topic (part two, with cats)

In part two of our miniseries on pets, we cover cats, monkeys, birds, and more. Find out the surprising origins of the word for parrot, what medieval people named their cats, and what bird was symbolic of the Virgin Mary. 

Show Notes

@AllEndlessKnot on Twitter

Medieval Pets by Kathleen Walker-Meikle

"Greek and Roman Household Pets", Francis D. Lazenby

Animals for Show and Pleasure in Ancient Rome, George Dennison

Companion Animals and Us: Exploring the Relationships Between People and Pets Anthony L. Podberscek, Elizabeth S. Paul, James A. Serpell, eds.

Our episode on farm animals

Episode 54: Our Pet Topic (part one)

The Lady and the Unicorn, Desire (Musée de Cluny

Federico II Gonzaga by Titian

Episode 53: Tiki or Not Tiki?

We head back to the Endless Knot Cocktail Bar to talk about the history of the Mai Tai, the Tiki craze, Polynesian mythology, cultural appropriation, and World's Fairs. And then we turn to Rome's relationship to Greece, and discuss whether Horace wrote the Exotica music of the ancient world!

Show Notes

Mai Tai Video

@AllEndlessKnot on Twitter

Mai Tai Recipe

Episode 51: Race & Racism in Ancient & Medieval Studies, Part One: the Problem

What are the problems surrounding race and racism in the fields of Classics and Medieval Studies today? Where did these fields come from, and how does that affect the way we think about the past, and how we construct the present? For this episode (and the next) we interviewed eight scholars and put it together into an exploration of these unfortunately timely topics. Thank you to Katherine Blouin, Damian Fleming, Usama Ali Gad, Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Asa Mittman, Dimitri Nakassis, Helen Young, and Donna Zuckerberg for their generous contributions of time and thoughtful discussion of these difficult subjects. In our next episode, we will hear about possible responses to these problems -- in teaching, scholarship, and more.

Show Notes

Transcript

Conversation Starter cocktail

Episode 44: "Us" & "Them" in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds

Part Two: Responses

Dr. Katherine Blouin
Everyday Orientalism blog
@isisnaucratis

Dr. Damian Fleming
@FW_Medieval

Dr. Usama Ali Gad
Classics in Arabic blog
@Usamaligad78

Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Classics at the Intersections blog
Sourcebook on Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World
@kataplexis

Dr. Asa Mittman
 Inconceivable Beasts: The Wonders of the East in the Beowulf Manuscript

Dr. Dimitri Nakassis
Aegean Prehistory blog
@DimitriNakassis

Dr. Helen Young
Race & Popular Fantasy: Habits of Whiteness
@heyouonline

Dr. Donna Zuckerberg
Eidolon
@donnazuck

The Public Medievalist's series on Race, Racism, & the Middle Ages

In the Middle blog (frequently has useful posts on these subjects)

Hold My Mead: A Bibliography For Historians Hitting Back At White Supremacy by Sarah Bond

Medieval People of Color Tumblr

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Episode 45: Costumes & the Language of Fashion

Our Hallowe'en themed episode this year is about costumes -- and etymologies and origin stories of a whole bunch of iconic items of clothing. We talk about the semiotics of fashion, the many varieties of the toga, and hats that caused fainting fits, and finish off with a couple of spooky Roman stories! Also, check out this year's Hallowe'en video, on words for Ghost.

Show Notes

#2PodsADay

Werewolf Cocktail recipe

"Costume" video

"Jack o'Lantern" video

Ep 22: Jack o'Lantern podcast

The "gens togata": Changing Styles and Changing Identities 

Justin Trudeau in Canadian Tuxedo ( Source )

Justin Trudeau in Canadian Tuxedo (Source)

Episode 44: "Us" & "Them" in the Ancient & Anglo-Saxon Worlds

What words did the Greeks, Romans, and Anglo-Saxons use to talk about different groups of people? What differences did they think were important? How do those compare to modern conceptions of ethnicity, national identity, or race? We try to give some basic background on this complicated question, starting with the etymology of the vocabulary and addressing some of the ways differences were conceptualized.

Show Notes

Full transcript of this episode

#2PodsADay

Video on the Anglo-Saxon Invasion, collaboration with Jabzy

Ethnicity in Herodotus--The Honest Entry

How is the Ancient Mediterranean Diverse If Everyone There Is "White"?

“Black Odysseus, White Caesar: When Did "White People" Become "White"?” James H. Dee. The Classical Journal. Vol. 99, No. 2 (Dec., 2003 - Jan., 2004), pp. 157-167

“Did ancient identity depend on ethnicity? A preliminary probe” Erich Gruen. Phoenix. Vol. 67, No. 1/2 (2013), pp. 1-22.

Were Medieval People Racist?

“Medieval and Modern Concepts of Race and Ethnicity” Robert Bartlett.

Caitlin Green’s blog, for general evidence of diversity in Britain

Race and Ethnicity in Anglo-Saxon Literature. Stephen Harris, Taylor & Francis, 2003.

Where the the term "White People" come from?

Colorlines in Classical North Africa

 

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Episode 28: Coach, or The History (& Future?) of Education

We trace the history of 'coach' back to its Hungarian roots, and explore its connections to the development of higher education in Europe. Then we run through a capsule history of the goals (stated and unstated!) of education from classical Athens to today, and discuss how the new world of online learning, including YouTube and podcasts, fits into the ideals and best practices of the future of education. Please let us know about all the things we over-simplified, left out, or got wrong in the process of covering almost 3000 years of western European schooling, and weigh in on where you see things heading now!

Show Notes

"Coach" video

CGP Grey's video  “Digital Aristotle”

Veritasium's video “This Will Revolutionize Education”

Our Patreon page

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Episode 26: Rogue One

We're joined by Sam McLean to discuss Rogue One's connections to Germanic heroism, Norse thautr, Roman epic, Terry Pratchett, heist films, &  The Dirty Dozen. Following up last year's conversation about The Force Awakens, we're interested in seeing how the newest Star Wars film changes genres and develops new themes.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

This podcast episode on YouTube

Our Patreon page

Show Notes

Episode 9: The Force Awakens

Sam McLean

British Naval History

Episode 22: Jack o'Lantern

In our Halloween episode we discuss the origins of the holiday, the etymology of Jack o'Lantern, the Canadian connections to trick-or-treating, and the great pumpkin scandal of 2016, and we read a Roman poem about witches scared off by a wooden fertility god.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

The podcast on YouTube

Our Patreon page

Show Notes

@HumCommCasters & @HumCommVids

Snopes.com pumpkin article

Horace Satires 1.8

"Costume" video

Episode 17: Loaf

We talk about words for bread and the close connection between "loaf" and lords, ladies, and dairy-maids, then turn to the history of baking bread and our adventures with sourdough, baking Pompeian bread, and brewing beer.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

Our Patreon page -- and thank you to all our Patreon supporters!

Show Notes

Turkish language website
Stack Brewing
"Loaf" video
Re-creating the Pompeii loaf video
 

Our picture of bread from the ROM Pompeii exhibit.

Our picture of bread from the ROM Pompeii exhibit.

A loaf of Pompeian bread from the British Museum

A loaf of Pompeian bread from the British Museum

Our attempt to recreate Pompeian bread:

Episode 16: Red

We talk about Old English, Greek, and Latin words for red, the cultural importance of dyes, basic colour terms, blushes, blood, and gods. And a little bit about sex and phalluses, but only in the most genteel way. We promise.

iTunes link

Stitcher link

Google Play Music link

Our Patreon page -- and thank you to all our Patreon supporters!

Show Notes

MythTakes Podcast

Lexicon Valley: Red Herring

Lexicon Valley: Orange and Ben Zimmer's blogpost

"Album" podcast episode

Our "Weird" video